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O! (Getting Graphic)

Smart Bitch Sarah, on The Slightest Provocation’s forthcoming May mass-market cover:

…shirt unbuttoned but still tucked in + mullet + O-face is TOTAL WIN. Way to go on achieving the romance trifecta!!

Making it sound, though its curlicues of well-wrought irony, more-or-less like a good thing (I think), though I wasn’t entirely sure what “O-face” meant.

Well, I figured I could guess, but Sarah (in an email last week) defined it better than I could, in inimitable Bitchspeak. To wit,

facial expression implying either sexual rapture, gastrointestinal distress, or both

In any case, you’ll get to weigh in on old cover vs new at the Smart Bitches Trashy Books blog today, while I lurk in the shadows of cyberspace (or more likely duck for shelter).

Interesting notes so far: more than one comment mentioned that the guy looks like Hugh Jackman. And I guess he does. What do you think?

But he really doesn’t have a mullet (but if you wanna see mullets, come back soon for some of my foreign covers).

And while we’re making O-sounds (and flogging re-issues — oops, totally unintentional pun there), I was a little bit surprised by this headline on Slate.com today: A review of a new graphic novel based on the pornographic Story of O. Because it’s not a new graphic novel at all, but merely a re-issue of the venerable Guido Crépax comic — which was originally published… gosh I don’t remember how long ago, but when I was writing Carrie’s Story, sometime in ’93 or ’94, I figured the graphic version was well-enough known that I could refer to it casually, in Carrie’s voice, thusly:

I settled into a fairly comfortable position, dimly aware (the milk must have been drugged) that I was falling asleep in the same position that O did, her first night at Roissy, in the Guido Crépax illustration.

Still, I highly recommend the graphic novel, in any edition, not to speak of the novel itself, by Dominique Aury, w/a Pauline Réage. And if you’d like to know what I thought, and still think about the novel that inspired Carrie’s Story and maybe everything I’ve written since then, you can still read what I (w/a Molly Weatherfield) had to say about it on Slate.com in 1998 (though the title of the article was theirs, not mine) .

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